Integrated Pest Management

El Paso Pesticide Applicator Training Workshop during lunch. February 4, 2014.

El Paso Pesticide Applicator Training Workshop (during lunch) at YISD Cultural Arts Center. February 4, 2014.

The Integrated Pest Management Program of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service provides research-based information and education for agricultural producers, agribusiness, consumers and citizens in the urban areas. The IPM Program disseminates expert, reliable, and current educational information in the areas of integrated pest management.

The IPM Program offers education that transfers new knowledge and technologies from research to users, enhances communities and the environment, and enables individuals to improve the quality of their lives through improved decision-making. Research is an integral part of this program whereby demonstrations in agriculture are conducted every year to determine the IPM practices needed by producers to increase yield and profit and reduce conventional pesticide use.

The Integrated Pest Management Agent serves the Agricultural and Urban clientele of El Paso County and Hudspeth County. He is supported by Extension Specialists who provide current research applications and educational material. These Specialists are located on the Texas A&M University campus and at district research and extension centers across the state.

 

TDA AGRICULTURAL APPLICATOR TESTING: 

The Texas Department of Agriculture has contracted with PSI Services LLC to administer exams for all agricultural pesticide licensing. For information on the procedures each agricultural licensee (Private, Commercial, Noncommercial, and Political Subdivision Noncommercial) must follow to take their examination(s) click here. The El Paso Test Center is located at: 1155 Westmoreland, Suite 110 (The Atrium). Directions: From I-10 W, take the Airway exit North. Turn right at the first light (Viscount). Turn right on Westmoreland Dr.

To order the pesticide applicator training manuals please visit: AgriLife Study Manuals.

 

IPM NEWSLETTERS

YEAR 2014:

  1. January 28 – Results of the 2013 El Paso Upland Cotton Variety Field Trials.
  2. March 17 – Results of the 2013 El Paso Evaluation of the Efficacy of Selected Insecticides on Pecan Aphid Population Densities.  Summaries of the 2014 El Paso Pesticide Applicator Training Workshop.
  3. April 2 – Farm Bill. Pecan nut casebearer monitoring program. Summaries of the 2014 Western Pecan Growers Association Conference in Las Cruces, NM.
  4. April 16 –  Soil temperatures for planting cotton. Pecan nut casebearer boring shoots in young pecan trees. Leaf curling in pomegranate. Tamarisk beetles active in Kansas and North Texas.
  5. April 24 - First pecan nut casebearer (PNC) moth captures in El Paso Lower Valley. Attached PNC Forecast brochure.
  6. May 12 – Pima and upland cotton variety trials. Cotton plant stand density trial. Pecan nut casebearer (PNC) damaging young pecan trees. Current PNC population levels.
  7. May 28 – Cotton plant stand densities. Differences in capture efficiency between the “Mexican” and the “standard” PNC pheromone lures. First saltcedar beetles in the region.
  8. June 6 – Cotton heat units. Second generation PNC. Blackmargined pecan aphids at treatment levels. Saltcedar beetles absent in El Paso. June beetle and its parasitoid.
  9. July 31 – Bollworm and Lygus on cotton. PNC and aphids on pecan. Increased abundance of the Subtropical Tamarisk Beetle on saltcedar plants in Far West Texas and New Mexico.
  10. August 15 – Increasing population levels of fall armyworms, bollworms, Lygus bugs, pecan aphids, and whiteflies. Entomological ID challenges.
  11. October 17 – Outdoor burn ban. Lowest blackmargined pecan aphid population in recent years. Cotton harvest aids field trial by Kerry Siders, AgriLife Extension Agent-IPM.

Newsletters from the previous 4 years

 

KTEP-Radio show “Good to Grow”: Saltcedar Biocontrol in  El Paso. Aired on September 13, 2014

Denise Rodriguez and Norma Martinez welcome back Dr. Salvador Vitanza, Extension Agent in Integrated Pest Management (IPM) at Texas A&M AgriLife Extension.  Dr. Vitanza tells us about the saltcedar leaf beetle which is defoliating saltcedars along the Rio Grande, including in the El Paso region and into southern New Mexico.  The beetle was released to control the saltcedar plants, considered an invasive species to our region.  Should we concern ourselves with the beetle, or should we let it continue to multiply and defoliate these plants?

Got bugs? Insects in the City is where you can learn more about common insects found around your home and landscape. Check out our fact sheet section for practical information on a variety of insect topics. Not sure what’s bugging you? Pest Wizard will help you name that insect or spider.

ABOUT TEXAS A&M AGRILIFE EXTENSION SERVICE:

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Contact:

Salvador Vitanza, Ph.D.

Extension Agent-IPM
Ysleta Annex
9521 Socorro Road
Suite A2 – Box 2
El Paso, TX 79927
Phone: (915) 860-2515
Fax: (915) 860-2536
Email: svitanza@ag.tamu.edu

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Salvador head shot 2Dr. Vitanza’s work focuses on cotton, pecan and urban integrated pest management programs in El Paso and Hudspeth Counties, Texas. He conducts weekly field and orchard scouting to support his pecan and cotton programs. In cotton, he provides variety demonstrations and plant performance data (upland and pima), cotton root rot management, plant population demonstrations, cotton production workshops, and turn-row meetings.   In pecans, his efforts to promote IPM for pecan nut casebearer control have been very helpful to producers. He organizes a workshop for pecan IPM with emphasis on pecan nut casebearer and aphid management. Pecan aphid control demonstrations provide growers with up-to-date management information. He writes the newsletter “Issues in Agriculture” to provide advice and updates to local farmers. Dr. Vitanza supports urban pest management as well. He serves the public on pest identification and management. In addition, he conducts a pesticide applicator training which consistently attracts over 200 participants, many of whom are employees or owners of urban pest control companies. Currently, he monitors the advance of the subtropical tamarisk beetle as well as its impact on saltcedar stands and educates the community about this successful biocontrol program. He is often interviewed on local TV/radio stations on insect pest issues.

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